How Ostriches, Kittens, and a Llama Named Steve Can Help Your Disc Golf Game.

Ostriches promo copy

Ostriches promo copy

Stepping up to the tee, you think to yourself, “I’ve played this hole a hundred times before.”.  This is a tournament on your home course.  You got this.  The 10 ft. gap in front of you, 60 feet off the tee, is something you can hit in your sleep.  You can’t remember the last time you hit one of the trees that define the gap.  You start your x-step.  You briefly think, “Just don’t hit those trees.”

Aaaaaaaand you hit the trees.

We’ve all been there.  I’ve been there a lot lately.  Missing gaps, losing discs in the water, or cranking putts into the front of the basket.  Stupid mistakes seem to show up in increasing numbers the more pressure we are under at the time.

Instead of getting mad and kicking those trees (please don’t, you’ll definitely lose that fight), there are other ways to try and limit how often this happens.  Find out how ostriches, kittens, and a llama named Steve can help you with this dilemma over at the Mind Body Disc blog.

Dynamic Discs TV Episode 01 #discgolf #growthesport #bedynamic

DynamicDiscsDisc

Poison Ivy on the Disc Golf Course: Recognize, Avoid, Treat

Poison Ivy on the Disc Golf Course - Disc Golf Family

Poison Ivy on the Disc Golf Course - Disc Golf Family

 

Do you know that according to the American Academy of Dermatology 85% of the population will have an allergic reaction to Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, or Poison Sumac. If you happen to be in the elite 15% of people who have no reaction (like my wife and daughter evidently) then I have a big sarcastic “hip, hip, hooray” for you!

This article is for the rest of us doomed to itch and scratch “late at night while [we're] sleeping” whenever “poison ivy comes a creeping” as the song says. I am going to help you spot the “irritating” plants, clear up some myths, and discuss what I recently used to treat it.

Poison Ivy and its compatriots can be the bane of a disc golfer’s existence (and chiggers…I hate those things). My son and I recently were affected by poison ivy after playing a new disc golf course. His rash was worse than mine. It seems my reaction to the oil of these plants has lessened as I have gotten older. I can recall in the third grade my best friend and I having the itchy red spots all over our bodies after returning from a weekend camping trip.

You would think that after the multiple times I have suffered from poison ivy I would be better at staying away from it. Unfortunately, I often spot the plant too late, or not at all. However, hopefully you will be a little more cautious then I, and my son, tend to be. The photos within this post should help you identify Poison Ivy and her buddies so that you can avoid them.

The myths and realities concerning these poisonous plants below are from an article by the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). You can follow a link to the AAD article in the resources section at the end of this post.

 

Fact and Fiction

Myth #1: “Yuck, do not touch me. I don’t want your rash to get on me!”…

 

To read the rest of this article, go to: http://discgolffamily.com/poison-ivy-disc-golf-course/

Read This BEFORE You Give A Disc To A New Disc Golfer

new-disc-golfer

When you think about it you cannot just give a disc away to a new disc golfer. You cannot give a disc to the first person you meet! Correctly giving away a disc golf disc ensures that our sport continues to grow exponentially. Got some spare discs in  your trunk? Give a disc go a new disc golfer! But before you do READ THIS FIRST

new-disc-golfer

I wish I started at this age! The younger players will have the benefits of a mainstream sport by the time they are older!

Feeling a Little Stiff and Sore?

mobility promo

mobility promo

We put our bodies through some serious punishment out on the disc golf course.  Hiking across uneven terrain.  Bending down, standing up, bending down, standing up.  Violent twisting motions.  All that can lead to trouble pretty quickly.  I can’t be the only one who has woken up the morning after a tournament feeling like I was run over by a bus… twice.

One way to help with that is to have a good mobility and warm up routine.  One you can use before and after rounds.  One you can use when training and working out.  One that doesn’t take a ton of time, but is still effective.

In our continuing series devoted to disc golf specific training, we tackle the topic of mobility this week and what you can do to increase yours.

Read all about it over at the Mind Body Disc blog!

Boy Scout to Build Disc Golf Course

David Wolverton: Boy Scout to Build Disc Golf Course - Disc Golf Family

 David Wolverton: Boy Scout to Build Disc Golf Course - Disc Golf Family

 

As mentioned in our previous article, “Spectators, the Key to Disc Golf Growth” we wrote about “Grow the Sport” of disc golf.  We were recently contacted by David Wolverton who is doing that very thing by designing and building a disc golf course in his local community of Middlesex County, New Jersey for his Eagle Scout Project.

An Eagle Scout Project has many requirements that must be met in order for the Candidate, like David, to qualify for his Eagle Award. Some of those requirements are:

  • The Project must be helpful to a religious institution, school, or the community (other than related to Boy Scouting)
  • The Scout must present the impact or benefit the project will provide to the organization
  • The Scout must lead the project and must be able to succeed independently without direct supervision
  • The Scout must come up with the proposal and present it
  • The Scout must develop a plan for implementing the project
  • If necessary, he must set up a fundraiser solely for the project itself
  • The Scout must identify potential hazards/risks and outline strategies to prevent and handle any injuries or emergencies
  • The project must be approved upon completion.

More information on the Eagle Scout Project Requirements can be found at: http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-025.pdf

 

We had the opportunity to interview David about his Eagle Scout Project. David is 15 years old and is a member of Boy Scout Troop 132 in East Brunswick, New Jersey. He is on an ultimate Frisbee team and has been playing for 3 years.  He also has been playing disc golf for a little over a year (PDGA #61922). In addition to his involvement with Boy Scouts he also is “very active in school, church and 4-H.”

At the end of this article, there is a link to David’s “kickstarter” fundraiser where his goal is to raise $9500 in order to build the disc golf course at Thompson Park.  David put together an excellent video describing his project. All of the information regarding the course layout, the costs, and his fundraiser tournament can be found at his “Kickstarter campaign.”  Please be sure to visit it to help him reach his goal!…

 

To read the rest of this article, go to: http://discgolffamily.com/boy-scout-disc-golf/

Be a Part of a Disc Golf Social Media Milestone!

Photo Sep 23, 8 54 33 AM

Photo Sep 23, 8 54 33 AM

  1.  That’s how many followers Disc Golf Shout Outs has on Instagram as I write this post.  For those of you that are familiar with Instagram, that might not sound like a lot.  There are plenty of accounts with hundreds of thousands, even millions, of followers.

But not any accounts related to disc golf.  For some reason, even though a ton of disc golfers have and look at Instagram daily, they are typically very stingy with the follow button.  Come on folks!

Innova, the largest and best selling manufacturer of discs has 6448 followers.  Discmania has 3147.  Avery Jenkins, one of the more active pro disc golfers on Instagram has 6166.  Eric McCabe, one of the more artistic, and also very active posters, has 3562.

I always hear people complain about disc golf not being on TV.  Well, social media follows is a huge gauge these days as to how big of an audience disc golf would get on TV.  If we can’t even support the media outlets we already have, why open a new one?

See what you can do to help and get some tips on who and how to follow on Instagram over at Mind Body Disc!

Spectators: The Key to Disc Golf Growth

Spectators the Key to Disc Golf Growth- Disc Golf Family

Spectators the Key to Disc Golf Growth- Disc Golf Family

 

Would you like to see disc golf on ESPN? “Grow the Sport” is a phrase you often hear promoted in disc golf circles.

Yet, despite a growth rate of “10 to 20 percent” of new disc golfers annually, as claimed by Steve Dodge in his February, 2013 article “Grow the Sport: Who Are You Watching,” and the fact that from 2000 to 2008 the number of disc golf courses doubled (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_golf) we lovers of the sport find ourselves still waiting for disc golf to make it “big time.”

Why is disc golf not televised? Why do professional disc golfers not make more money? Why should you care?

That third question, “why should you care?,” is close to the question that the “big sponsors” like Coke or Nike ask which is “how much do you care?”

The answer to 3 out of 4 of these questions is: spectators, and more importantly paying spectators. The answer to “why should you care?” I will discuss in the remainder of this article as well as why “paying spectators” is the way the sport must grow in the coming years.

 

“In order to put my ‘money where my mouth is’ I am giving away to one lucky person two VIP passes ($50.00 value) to the USDGC this October 1-4, 2014 at the Winthrop Gold Course in Rock Hill, S.C. To be entered in this giveaway all you have to do is write in the comments section of this post, “I want the VIP passes” by no later than Sunday, September 21st at 11:59pm Eastern Standard Time.  We will draw for the tickets on September 22, 2014 and notify the winner immediately. Full rules for the giveaway can be found at this link: USDGC VIP Pass Giveaway Rules.”

 

What It Will Take to Attract Big Sponsors

First, let’s begin the discussion with what will it take to attract big sponsors like Coke and Nike to disc golf. In a recent (Sept. 5th, 2014) podcast interview on The Local Route with Executive Director Brian Graham of the PDGA he said, “without people out on the course watching the tournaments we are not going to draw national sponsors.”

 

To read the rest of this article, go to: http://discgolffamily.com/spectators-key-disc-golf-growth/

Please, if This is You, Stop it Already!

angry homer talk dg

angry homer talk dg

Disc Troy (a very good blog and worth a read!) recently put up a post about the top 10 things that disc golfers do that annoy other disc golfers (you can read that post here).  It’s a great post and I think he did a nice job of coming up with a list we can all relate to.

After some recent tournament and doubles experiences, though, I’m going to have to add one to Troy’s list.  It’s something we’ve all probably done ourselves.  For sure we all did it when we first started playing.

Most likely, you’ve played with people this summer who have done this.  You’ve also probably gotten frustrated with them for it.

In tournaments, it can cost you strokes and therefore ratings points.  In doubles it makes you a less desirable partner.  In solo rounds, it makes you kick yourself and swear at yourself under your breath.

Know what it is yet?

Find out over at Mind Body Disc.

September newsletter from Explore Disc Golf

ExploreDGAvatar

The Mobile Disc Golf Experience’s 3-week run was one for the books!
We are just getting settled back here at home base in western Massachusetts after a 3-week run that took The Mobile Disc Golf Experience over 2,500 miles to events in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Illinois earlier this month. We installed one 3-hole course and two 6-hole courses during the stretch and saw thousands of rounds played on our Mobile layouts. A great time was has by all!

To read our newsletter in its entirety, click here.

Lockn tee

The 4th tee box at Lockn’ Festival in Arrington, VA. The fairway is defined by several “corkscrew” trees, and played as one of the toughest holes on the course. The 9 hours of clearing was well worth it for this view during sunset!

 

Building a Disc Golf Home Gym, Part 1

In this 32 square foot area is all you'll need to train for disc golf!

I went from the proud owner of a BowFlex to the not so proud owner of the world’s most expensive clothes rack.  You’d think I would learn my lesson, but over the next 20 or so years after that, I bounced back and forth between gym memberships and home equipment.  Always looking for the perfect thing that would whip me into shape and keep me feeling good.  You see, I hate working out, but I love having worked out.  It’s one of life’s cruel tests of will.

In that time, I’ve had two different BowFlex machines (hey, they came out with a new improved version!), a Nordic Track, a rowing machine, a Smith machine, a power rack, 2 full sets of free weights, resistance bands, and more DVDs and workout books than I care to admit to buying.  In between those were memberships to at least 4 different health clubs.  For the last 12 years, I’ve been lucky enough to work somewhere that has an incredible on site gym that’s free to use.  But even at the low low price of free, I’ve only used it off and on.

In this 32 square foot area is all you'll need to train for disc golf!

In this 32 square foot area is all you’ll need to train for disc golf!

Armed with the knowledge gained over 20 years of pain and bad decisions, I decided about a year ago to build yet another home gym.  This time, it would be one I actually used and stuck with.  I had my “why” of wanting to train specifically for disc golf (and I’m more committed to that every day), and I had all those years of experience doing it the wrong way.  Here at the Mind Body Disc blog, we’re going to lay out the disc golf home gym the same way I built it, and started to use it.  One small step at a time.

Check out the first step at the Mind Body Disc blog!

Disc Golf Field Work: Improving Your Drive

Disc Golf Field Work: Improving Your Drive - Disc Golf Family

Disc Golf Field Work: Improving Your Drive - Disc Golf Family

 

How do you practice your drives? Do you even throw drives outside of playing a round of disc golf?

I’ll admit that the idea of going to a field and throwing 20 or so discs in the same direction and then picking up all those discs and doing the same thing again 4 or 5 times is not nearly as appealing as a round of disc golf. In fact, that is why I do not do it as often as I should. However, if we really want to improve our drives it is a necessary exercise.

Furthermore, we want our practice to build good habits and good mechanics not reinforce poor technique. Therefore, a component of our practice should include some way to gauge our form. In addition, the goal of our driving practice should include more than just throwing discs far.

I am going to share with you how I am currently practicing drives, and give you my thoughts on how you can make the experience more productive than just “throwing discs in a field.” Also, I am going to suggest a way to make the experience more fun.

 

Open Field and Cones

First, you have to find a large open field. If you have access to a high school football field that you can use you are golden, as long as you do not throw over 360 feet (the end zones are each 30 feet in case you did not know). However, in my town every football field comes with a fence and a padlock. I’ve seen too many episodes of America’s Funniest Home Videos of poor fools hanging upside down from their shorts to give climbing the fence a try. So, we use a large open field (which happens to be next to the football field).

Assuming you do not have an accessible football field with every yard conveniently marked, you have to come up with a way to measure distance. To mark distance I use a 50 foot rope and several of those cheap orange cones. The 50 foot rope will make laying out the cones quick. Plus, 50 feet of rope left in your car’s trunk at all times can come in handy often…

 

To read the rest of this article, go to: http://discgolffamily.com/disc-golf-field-work-improving-drive/

The 2014 Green Mountain Championships

hyzer-flip-beer-label

The Green Mountain Championship’s debut in 2013 was an event to remember. As a B-Tier with $4000 added cash, Smugglers’ Notch Resort and Brewster Ridge Disc Golf provided not only a tournament that had touring pros buzzing, but complemented the play on the course with music and Vermont craft beer in a beautiful mountain resort setting. 2014 has brought the return of this event, but this year, it’s bigger and better. The field has doubled to 144, the added cash has doubled to $8,000, and Prodigy Disc has jumped in to support it as the title sponsor.

Read the full story on PDGA.com…

hyzer-flip-beer-label

PDGA Worlds Hits the Airwaves

dgptvworldsarticle.41

For most of the formative years of disc golf, tournament directors were challenged to attract spectators and fans to their events, so that sponsors could be convinced our sport had a significant following. These days, however, with the ballooning number of media outlets and distribution platforms, disc golf has been able to flip the script. Now, instead of the challenge being to bring fans to the disc golf tournament, the latest media technologies have allowed us to take the tournament to disc golf fans. And that is no more apparent than with this month’s broadcasting of the 2014 PDGA Professional World Championships TV show on 26 regional sports affiliates around the world.

 

Read the full story on PDGA.com…

dgptvworldsarticle.41

Disc Golf Show – Episode 15

Episode15

Click Here to Download the Podcast


Episode15

Episode 15 is here!!
***This episode is sponsored by Vanish Disc Golf LLC. Use the Coupon code DGSHOW6 for 10% off of your entire order on their website www.vanishapparel.com

Click Here to download the Show Notes


Click Here to Download the Podcast